Refinishing Kitchen Table with Chalk Paint and Stain - Farmhouse Table Video Tutorial

This post contains affiliate links. I will receive a small commission for products purchases through these links. I appreciate your support!

Hi friends! A lot has happened since I last posted on here. First things firsts, the Muscaris are now Tennesseans! We sold our house in Illinois in June and moved to Franklin, Tenn. Needless to say, things have been a bit crazy for me unpacking and settling into a new home. 

I finally had a little down time and was able to wrap up a video tutorial of the last project I did in our old house. My husband scored this amazing dumpster dive find back in April, a Pottery Barn table! I gave it a farmhouse spin, and it's now our new kitchen table.

I'll give you a few details down below, but check out the my video to see how to create this look for yourself.

I did a new finish for me on this table top using Varathane Premium Fast Dry Wood Stain.

in the color Sunbleached. It's a beautiful finish that gives you that driftwood look that is gray but also lets some of that natural wood goodness shine through. I've worked with this stain before, but this was a new color for me. It is super pigmented, so I only had to do one coat, and it dries fast too. I used my new go to topcoat to seal it, General Finishes High Performance Top Coat in Flat.

For the apron, I used the same technique I did on my last kitchen table makeover. I painted it with one coat of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Old White and distressed the whole surface with a 400 grit sandpaper. I love this paint so much because there is no need to sand or strip your furniture. I didn't seal it with wax or topcoat because I love the chalky finish the paint has, and the apron doesn't get the wear that the table top does. I did the same finish on my last kitchen table, and it held up pretty well with my kids who are some of the messiest people alive. I just use warm water to wipe it up.

All these shots were taken in our old home in Illinois. It looks even better in our new house in Tennessee!

More projects are on the way! I can't wait to share them with you and some shots of our new home. And don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel, so you don't miss any of my tutorials and reviews.

My New Obsession: Annie Sloan® Graphite

I have a new color obsession to share with you- Annie Sloan®'s Graphite. Any fans of PrettyDistressed™ know I love me some Old White, Paris Grey, French Linen and an occasional Duck Egg Blue in her Chalk Paint™ line. In the past, I have shied away from using Graphite. It is the darkest color in the Annie Sloan Chalk Paint® pallet, and I had heard it can be tricky to work with. But let me tell you now that I have used it, I am dying to paint something in my house with this color. It's so rich and unique. Then once you put the wax on, it comes to life!



I am so grateful for my clients, and the way they push me out of my comfort zone. She selected Graphite for this dresser I was refinishing for her son's room. She has an amazing old century home and has a lot of antique brass throughout the home, so we knew we wanted to do a brass cup pull on the dresser. I selected the Martha Stewart Bedford Brass Canopy Cup Pull from HomeDepot.com. Graphite is really the ultimate complement to the antique brass. The cool thing about it is it's not a true black but more of a slate like a chalkboard.

My client only wanted mild distressing, so I went with a different technique than I usually use. Instead of making big brush strokes in every direction, I kept my strokes smooth and in one direction. I did two coats and really covered the wood. Then I took a 400 grit sandpaper and smoothed the entire piece down. This technique exposed just a smidge of the original finish on the edges of the drawers and corners. I finished it off with Annie Sloan clear wax.
antique brass pull



graphite

annie sloan graphite


chalk paint

I am really excited about working with Graphite more. I need it in my house somewhere! Trust me, you have to check it out for yourself. I've got some more projects in cue right now and can't wait to share more reveals with you soon. Happy painting!

IKEA Dresser Meets Miss Mustard Seed

Milk Paint has long been an intrigue of mine. I first learned about it when I started Pretty Distressed back in 2014, and found about Miss Mustard Seed paint. If you don't follow Marian's blog, Miss Mustard Seed, you should. She is a real inspiration to furniture painters.

I was wasting time one day in downtown Geneva, Ill. before I had to pick up the kids from school and wondered into an antique shop who just happened to carry the paint. I snagged the last bag of Farmhouse White they had. I couldn't wait to get it home and play around with it! I had an IKEA dumpster dive in my garage that was screaming for a makeover and my youngest was in desperate need of more drawer space.


miss mustard seed farmhouse white

As my avid followers are aware, I am a big fan and user of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. I love it for the ease of no prep furniture painting. For those who are thinking about trying Milk Paint, it really is a entirely different animal. It comes in powder form and you mix it with water to create a milky consistent paint. You can do some really cool things with it. The one that intrigued me the most was a really chippy look.

I started by using my orbital sander to take off the current stain because it was really slick and orange. I wanted more of an industrial look since this is for a boy's room, so I sanded it down to strip the color completely. Then I played around with some stain that I had. I ended up using Minwax Special Walnut, one of my personal favs, and Varathane Weathered Gray in a 1:1 ratio.  
special walnut

After I stained the whole dresser, I randomly applied some all natural beeswax to help create the chippy effect I wanted once I applied the paint. I had some on hand, but Miss Mustard Seed carries beeswax, too. The wax repels the paint and allows it to flake off in chippy, gorgeous chunks.
natural beeswax

Next up was painting. There are directions on each bag of paint on how to mix it up. You can select the amount of paint you want to use and mix the powder and water in a 1:1 ratio. You can't save the paint to use later, so mix cautiously. You can always mix up more if you run out. I did two coats.
milk paint

I didn't see any chipping until after my second coat dried, so don't freak out if the first coat doesn't chip. I don't know how this works, but it is super cool. And resist the urge to scrape the flakes off before it is completely dry. Set a timer and stay away! Below is a pic of what the chipping looks like. When it is dry you can take a putty knife and start chipping away at the spots that are flaking. I'm no expert here, just an experimenter. If you want tips on how to paint with Milk Paint check out Miss Mustard Seed's YouTube channel. It is were I went for a how to.
farmhouse white

Scraping the paint off is so fun! But it is definitely not meant for people who like having total control over the piece. It does what it wants, and you have to roll with it. I didn't take any pictures of me chipping it away, but here is how it looked at the end.
industrial furniture

To seal the piece I used my Annie Sloan Soft Wax in clear. Miss Mustard Seed has her own wax as well, but again I used what I had on hand. For the industrial look I was going for I ordered some library label pulls from Amazon. Here is what the finished product looks like. 
farmhouse white

miss mustard seed

industrial pull

farmhouse white

furniture paint

It was really so much fun playing with milk paint to achieve this chippy, industrial look. What do you think? Would you like to try it out?

Off to Market

Spring is in the air, and this is my favorite time of the year to paint. Drawing up the garage door and taking in the fresh air while sipping on an iced coffee from my Keurig was the place where Pretty Distressed was born. It soothes my soul. It is also a great time of year for moving and garage sales, and I just scored two beautiful pieces from such a sale. Today, I will be sharing the first reveal from my haul. And the most exciting news is she is looking for a new home.



This Queen Anne Thomasville sideboard is a real beauty, and she was in such great shape that it was pretty hard to take my paint brush to it. But you know me, I just couldn't help myself. I painted it with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint® in French Linen with some medium distressing. Then, I finished it off with Annie Sloan Soft Wax in clear and some dark around the detailing to give it that aged patina. French Linen is considered a neutral, so it really can blend in with any color pallet.

I love how formal and fancy this piece is, but the paint job makes it casual and comfy at the same time. She is also really versatile. It would really work great as a focal point in a foyer like I staged it, but it could also be used behind a sofa, as a media center, or the classic approach of a server in a dining room.







Once I got it all staged up in my foyer, I felt really tempted to keep it. It is such a different look than my Goodwill Dresser that sits here. But in the end, I decided I am not quite ready to part ways with my signature piece yet. This little lady sure made me ponder it for a while. So, off to market she goes. Check out my Shop Furniture tab if you are interested in purchasing this piece or want to check out the rest of my work up for sale.

Are you a spring junkie like me? Is anyone else out there enjoying painting outside again? Here's to more reveals soon!

Goodwill Dresser Video Tutorial - Part 3 (Dark Wax)

Thanks for coming back to see the last installment of my Goodwill Dresser video tutorial series. Today, I am covering the topic that seems to give most furniture refinishers the highest anxiety- dark wax. But let me put your fears to rest, it isn't really that tricky to master.  Annie Sloan Dark Wax is amazing stuff. It gives your piece an instant antique look that would normally take about a hundred years to occur naturally.

In case you don't know anything about my Goodwill Dresser, here she is.

I created this series, so you can get this same look right in your home. I think this will always be one of my favorite pieces, and once you create your own, you might just feel the same.


Here are some links to products used in this tutorial:

Make sure you check out the other videos in this series, Part 1 and Part 2. I would love to see your creations, so send me your before and after shots if you decided to try this technique out on your own.