Paris Grey Hutch Makeover

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It's been a while since I shared a client piece on here, but I had to share the latest client piece I finished. This thing is massive and was in such rough shape when I got it. I just love the way it turned out!

This hutch had been in a storage unit for some time and smelled pretty funky, so I started off by sealing the entire piece in

Zinsser Shellac

. This product along with neutralizing smells helps seal water stains and bleed through. It is always a great idea to coat a piece in Shellac if you don't know its history. I took an old sock and applied it over the entire piece before painting.

Originally, we had decided to rip out the mirrors and replace them with beadboard like on my personal

hutch makeover

. Once I ripped out the mirror, I realized the paneling on the hutch was real wood! It was in such good condition, so I could not bring myself to replace it. In the end, I think the beadboard backing would have detracted from the simplicity of this piece. This was a huge win.

My client selected

Annie Sloan Paris Grey

for this piece which is a great choice for staying neutral without doing white. Exciting side note, you can know buy Annie Sloan Chalk Paint on Amazon!

And for the top, she wanted a two toned look so I used my new go to stain

General Finishes Java Gel Stain

. The veneer on this top was pretty thin, so I used the stain right on top of the finished wood. This is a technique exclusive to gel stain. It is so pigmented you can use it right on top of finished wood. It definitely has a learning curve, but it has a huge payoff. I'm going to make a video on this technique soon for my YouTube channel, so make sure to

subscribe

if you want to see it.

My client's husband had some wood working skills, so he cut a shelf to replace the glass one in the hutch. You can see it in the pic above. I stained it with the Java Gel to match the top of the sideboard. I applied

General Finishes Gel Topcoat

to seal both pieces. Check out these awesome videos the folks at General Finishes put together to show you how to use these products. There is one for

gel stain over an existing finish

 and one for

applying gel topcoat

 (go to the 5 minute mark to see the portion on topcoat).

To add a touch of masculinity, we decided to replace the old hardware with antiqued cup pulls and knobs. This is more costly and in this case I had to drill new holes for the cup pulls, but it gives the piece a whole new look if you are up for the cost. I purchased the hardware from Menards for around $70, but you could also buy it on Amazon. The pulls are from Hickory Hardware, the Williamsburg Cub Cabinet Pull and the Cottage Cabinet Knob in dark antique copper. Click on the pictures below to see their specifications or to purchase them on Amazon.

The original hardware was not a standard 3" size. I run into this a lot with older pieces. Since I was using a cup pull there was no need to fill in the existing holes. I drilled new ones to fit the 3" cup pulls,  and they covered the old holes. If you are drilling new holes, I highly suggest getting a

cabinet mounting kit

. It will make measuring so much easier!

I finished this piece off with some light distressing. Then I sealed the entire piece with

Annie Sloan Clear Wax

. Then I used a light application of

Annie Sloan Dark Wax

around my distressed areas.

My client also decided she wanted to keep the glass in the cabinet doors. So I had to tape them off and spray paint the brass etching with some

Rust-oleum Universal All Surface Spray Paint Metallic

. This is my go to paint for getting a metal finish on hardware/metal. I used the color Burnished Amber.

I forgot to take pictures of this, but it is the same technique I used in a

sideboard makeover

if you need more details. Here is the finished door.

I had to crank through this pretty quickly because my client was relocating to China and had to start getting her stuff in shipping crates. I loved the way this turned out, and I am excited to know she will have a piece of cozy, farmhouse style in her home all the way in China!

If you need more step by step instructions on working with Chalk Paint. Check out my

YouTube Channel

 to see all my tutorials. I am hoping to really ramp up my channel this year. Let me know what you want to see.

And don't forget you can now buy Annie Sloan Chalk Paint on Amazon. Use my affiliate link on Amazon to help support Pretty Distressed! 

http://amzn.to/2mUrTLp

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My New Obsession: Annie Sloan® Graphite

I have a new color obsession to share with you- Annie Sloan®'s Graphite. Any fans of PrettyDistressed™ know I love me some Old White, Paris Grey, French Linen and an occasional Duck Egg Blue in her Chalk Paint™ line. In the past, I have shied away from using Graphite. It is the darkest color in the Annie Sloan Chalk Paint® pallet, and I had heard it can be tricky to work with. But let me tell you now that I have used it, I am dying to paint something in my house with this color. It's so rich and unique. Then once you put the wax on, it comes to life!



I am so grateful for my clients, and the way they push me out of my comfort zone. She selected Graphite for this dresser I was refinishing for her son's room. She has an amazing old century home and has a lot of antique brass throughout the home, so we knew we wanted to do a brass cup pull on the dresser. I selected the Martha Stewart Bedford Brass Canopy Cup Pull from HomeDepot.com. Graphite is really the ultimate complement to the antique brass. The cool thing about it is it's not a true black but more of a slate like a chalkboard.

My client only wanted mild distressing, so I went with a different technique than I usually use. Instead of making big brush strokes in every direction, I kept my strokes smooth and in one direction. I did two coats and really covered the wood. Then I took a 400 grit sandpaper and smoothed the entire piece down. This technique exposed just a smidge of the original finish on the edges of the drawers and corners. I finished it off with Annie Sloan clear wax.
antique brass pull



graphite

annie sloan graphite


chalk paint

I am really excited about working with Graphite more. I need it in my house somewhere! Trust me, you have to check it out for yourself. I've got some more projects in cue right now and can't wait to share more reveals with you soon. Happy painting!

Goodwill Dresser Video Tutorial - Part 1

This link contains affiliate links. I will receive a small commission from products purchased through these links.

I am still as in love with my Goodwill Dresser as the day I painted it. Above any other piece, this is the one I get the most questions about, so I decided to divulge my secret on how I created it using Annie Sloan Chalk Paint® in Old White. Get your painting clothes on, roll up your sleeves and get ready to dive in to create your own heavily distressed beauty.

This tutorial will be broken up into three parts and will show you how to create a very heavily distressed piece just like my Goodwil Dresser. Think heavy brush strokes, lots of distressing with sandpaper and lots of dark wax. 

In part one, I show you how to prep and paint the piece and hardware. Make sure you check out the description on YouTube for links to the products I used in this tutorial.



Part two is in the works and should be up on the blog next week. Check back to learn how to distress and clear wax your piece, or you can subscribe to my YouTube channel and you will be able to view part two as soon as it goes live. Happy painting!

The Goods on Mother Earth Paints

I recently shared my Girly Girl Dresser makeover for my daughter's room, and I owe you a review of the paint I used, Mother Earth Paints. The owner, Robin, contacted me and asked if I would be interested in trying out her paints and offering my honest opinion on them. Here is the Pretty Distressed low down on Mother Earth Paints.

Mother Earth Paints is based in Kansas City and was created by a former vintage store owner and avid furniture painter who had used her fair share of chalk enhanced/furniture paint. Her dream was to take her favorite properties from each paint she had come across and put them into one "does it all" paint.
pink and white dresser

This water-based, low VOC paint has a sweet smell that is not irritating at all, so you can paint in your home without a problem. I had to do three coats of each color to get the coverage I wanted. Normally, I like to only have to do two coats, but I am still saving time by not having to prime or sand the piece. I also think coverage will depend on what your are painting and your purpose, so one or two coats could work for some. I was impressed by how smooth the paint went on and how little brush strokes I saw. This paint would be perfect for those who are interested in getting a smoother, more polished finish versus a rustic thick look. 

I selected Blush and Vintage for my paint colors. The Blush color ended up drying a little brighter and less pastel than I expected, but I am still happy with the colors. The Vintage color is an off white but not too creamy. It mixes perfectly with a pure white like you see on the bead board in my daughter's room.

Distressing was also a breeze. Mother Earth can be distressed with a wet sponge or sandpaper. I typically work with sandpaper, so I did the same on this piece. This paint is perfect for creating shabby chic pieces, and you only need a light hand to distress.
distressed white pink dresser

To finish off the piece, I used Mother Earth's All Natural Beeswax finish. This product had the biggest difference from other furniture wax I have used. It is made with three simple ingredients: beeswax, olive oil and carnauba wax. It has absolutely no chemical smell at all. The other waxes I have used are so stinky, I use a respirator mask and latex gloves to protect myself. I also found it was easier to get even coverage, and I used way less of this product, too. It creates a really natural looking finish, but I still feel like my paint is well protected.
natural beeswax furniture finish

Robin was kind enough to send me some brushes to try out as well. Both of the brushes are made with 100% natural bristles. They worked perfectly with the paint, and I enjoyed using the flat one for the wax application in tandem with a clean, soft cloth. They are pretty reasonably priced compared to competitor brushes. I have some brushes that cost $60, and these are right up there with them in quality.
affordable chalk paint brush

Mother Earth Paints are sold at independent retailers across the country. You can find your closest retailer by visiting their Retailers section on their Site. If you don't have a retailer near you, Studio 1404 in Kansas City sells the products online. The Mother Earth Paints Site is under going some renovations right now, but should be offering online sales soon. Here is a list of the paint line's offerings and their Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (prices will vary from vendor to vendor): 

Paint Sample jars - 4 oz      $ 8.95
Paint Quart - 32 oz              $34.95  
Satin Topcoat Finish            $17.95              
Beeswax finish - 6 oz          $13.95     
                         -12 oz         $23.95
Metallic waxes                     $11.95
Brushes small                      $14.95  
               med                       $21.95  
               large                      $24.95

I hope you will stop by Mother Earth Paints and check them out. Tell them Pretty Distressed sent you. I had a lot of fun trying them out. Happy painting!

Sideboard w/ Leaves - Before & After

After a brief painting hiatus, I am back. I just completed another piece for a client this weekend. And I must confess, I was very scared when this piece was dropped off at my house. It was blonde oak, brass and in really rough shape. I don't know why I have such an aversion to brass, but it really makes me shudder.

It was quite the process to complete this piece. I stained the top which was a new technique for me. Stay tuned for all the details on the refinishing process later this week. For now, just enjoy the beauty of this transformed piece.




For this makeover, I used a 2:1 mix of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Paris Grey and Old White followed up with clear and dark wax. The top was stained with Minwax Polyshades in Espresso.

Just a reminder that my services are for hire in the Chicagoland area. Check out my Refinishing Services tab for more info. I would love to help you bring a dated piece back to life.

Linking up at: 
http://www.savvysouthernstyle.net photo TheHappyHousiebuttonfeb2_zpsbc362976.png Furniture Feature Fridays